An Inquiry Into the Beauties of Painting; ;and into the merits of the most celebrated painters, ancient and modern; Remarks on the Beauty of Poetry; observations on the correspondence between poetry and music. Daniel Webb.
An Inquiry Into the Beauties of Painting; ;and into the merits of the most celebrated painters, ancient and modern; Remarks on the Beauty of Poetry; observations on the correspondence between poetry and music.
An Inquiry Into the Beauties of Painting; ;and into the merits of the most celebrated painters, ancient and modern; Remarks on the Beauty of Poetry; observations on the correspondence between poetry and music.
An Inquiry Into the Beauties of Painting; ;and into the merits of the most celebrated painters, ancient and modern; Remarks on the Beauty of Poetry; observations on the correspondence between poetry and music.

An Inquiry Into the Beauties of Painting; ;and into the merits of the most celebrated painters, ancient and modern; Remarks on the Beauty of Poetry; observations on the correspondence between poetry and music.

London: R. & J. Dodsley, 1760. Published by London: Printed for R. and J. Dodsley, 1760. First Edition. Three parts in one volume 200, 123, and 155 pages. 2 pages of adds at the back all titles present nice clean text, bookplate of John Ward, recent professional full gilt re-back into original speckled calf binding. Webb was born at Maidstown, County Limerick, in 1718 or 1719, the eldest son of Daniel Webb of Maidstown Castle, and his wife Dorothea, daughter and heiress of M. Leake of Castle Leake, County Tipperary. He matriculated from New College, Oxford, on 13 June 1735. Following his studies, he went to Rome, where he became friendly with the Neoclassical painter Anton Raphael Mengs who painted his portrait. On his return to Britain he published his Inquiry into the Beauties of Painting (1760) Winkelmann later accused him of having plagiarized the work from the unpublished manuscript of Mengs' treatise Gedanken über die Schönheit. One of the attractive features of Webb's contribution to aesthetic theory in the eighteenth century lies in his concentration on music, poetry, and painting as works of art qua art, and not as devices or structures for enabling morality or imposing codes of conduct. In later life he lived mainly at Bath. England. He died, on 2 August 1798. Item #269

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