Item #501 QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]. Gesner J. M.
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]

QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA; [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]

London: Harding, Mavor, et Lepard, 1824. Full Marocco. [FORE-EDGE PAINTING]
QUINTI HORATII FLACCI OPERA
Gesner, J.M., editor
Harding, Mavor, et Lepard London 1824

338 pp. Text in Latin. With woodcut frontispiece and title vignette plus two fore-edge paintings. 16.4x10 cm (6½x4"), full dark red straight grain Morocco, raised bands, lettering and ruling in gilt; all edges gilt. The works of Horace, Ink ownership mark of previous owner on front flyleaf.

DOUBLE FORE-EDGE PAINTING
Incredibly detailed fore-edge paintings featuring views of Badminton House in Gloucestershire and the Stowe House, in Buckinghamshire.
Badminton House;
In 1612 Edward Somerset, 4th Earl of Worcester, bought from Nicholas Boteler his manors of Great and Little Badminton, called 'Madmintune' [sic] in the Domesday Book while one century earlier the name 'Badimyncgtun' was recorded, held by that family since 1275. Edward Somerset's third son Sir Thomas Somerset modernized the old house in the late 1620s, and built a new T-shaped gabled range. Evidence suggests he also built up on the present north and west fronts. The Dukes of Beaufort acquired the property in the late 17th century, when the family moved from Raglan Castle, Monmouthshire, which had been ruined in the Civil War. The third duke adapted Sir Thomas Somerset's house by incorporating his several gabled ranges around the courtyard and extending the old house eastwards to provide a new set of domestic apartments. He raised a grand Jonesian centrepiece on the north front. The two-bay flanking elevations were five storeys high, reduced to three storeys in 1713. Their domed crowning pavilions are by James Gibbs. For the fourth duke, who succeeded his brother in 1745, the architect William Kent renovated and extended the house in the Palladian style, but many earlier elements remain. The duke was instrumental in bringing the Italian artist Canaletto to England: Canaletto's two views of Badminton remain in the house.
Stowe House;
The medieval settlement of Stowe clustered around the parish church of St Mary's, Stowe. From 1330, the Osney Abbey maintained a manor house at Stowe occupied by a steward. Osney Abbey retained Stowe until it was forced to surrender its estates to the Crown in the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539.

Sir George Gifford MP owned Stowe Manor and Rectory. He willed it to his son Thomas Gifford (born about 1542 died 16 February 1593). The Stowe estate was leased from Thomas Gifford in 1571 by Peter Temple whose son, John Temple, bought the manor and estate of Stowe in 1589 and it eventually became the home of the Temple family. Their family fortune was based on sheep farming, at Witney in Oxfordshire, and in 1546 they rented a sheep farm in Burton Dassett in Warwickshire in the late 17th century, the house was completely rebuilt by Sir Richard Temple, 3rd Baronet, (c.1683) on the present site. This house is now the core of the mansion known today.
$3,110Usd. Very Good. Item #501

Price (USD): $3,110.00

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